Your credit reports are an ongoing record of how you've managed your finances. You should know exactly what they say about your financial history before you apply for a mortgage. These reports and your credit score play an important role in the loan approval process, and they also determine your interest rate and other loan terms that lenders will offer you.

Pre-approval requires the lender to pull the credit information (see Step 1) and assess your financial situation. The lender will then give you a letter that states the amount they would be willing to lend you. If you get in a multiple-offer scenario, being pre-approved may give you an edge because the seller will have more confidence that you will be approved for a loan large enough to purchase their home. 

For lenders, whether it’s a bank, credit union, or other type of lender, a down payment helps offset their risk in making a mortgage loan because it means the borrower immediately has some skin in the game–an investment to protect. The more money you pay down, the less the lender stands to lose if you default on payments and the lender has to foreclose, especially early in the loan term. This is why borrowers who put less than 20 percent down usually have to get PMI, as it protects lenders by repaying the unpaid portion of the loan if the borrower defaults.
Typically, you have to put between 3 and 20 percent of your home’s sale price down in cash to qualify for a conventional loan (30-year fixed mortgage), but there are exceptions. If you meet eligibility guidelines, you might qualify for a home loan with a zero-down payment through Veterans Affairs (VA loans) or the Department of Agriculture (USDA loan) programs.
You'll be inundated with possibilities, especially in the beginning of your home search. Your agent will send listings to your cellphone. You'll probably pick up "House For Sale" magazines and read classified ads in your local newspapers. You'll probably spend an inordinate amount of time surfing the Internet for homes. You might even plan afternoon drives to preview neighborhoods.

How you progress through a home buying transaction can vary somewhat depending on the real estate laws and customs where you live, but many steps are standard. You'll feel more confident about your home-buying journey when you understand the chain of events and what's required of you, as well as every other person who's involved in the transaction.

Highly desirable Alden Tract in West Hills. This lovely remodeled 3 bed 2 bath home features an abundance of natural light throughout. Newer laminate flooring in living room, hallway, bedrooms and kitchen; tile in bathrooms. All three of the spacious bedrooms feature good-sized closets with mirror sliding doors and ceiling fans. The brand new kitchen cabinets with all appliances included. Quartz counter tops with island open to living room. The large picture windows in the living room and dining area allow for perfect views of the lush back yard with beautiful flowerbeds. Perfect for entertaining with the covered patio providing shade in the hot summer days. Newer 4-ton central heat and air


If your offer called for a home inspection, this is a big day. Sure, you get to have a home inspector look over the home to make sure there are no unseen defects you want to negotiate to have fixed. But more importantly, this is the most time you’ll get to spend in your new home until closing. Go ahead and start measuring things and figuring out what goes where. This may be the last time you are inside the home until it is yours, several weeks from now. 

Although 20 percent isn’t a prerequisite to homeownership, many buyers do put that amount down and then some. Larger down payents are more prevalent for buyers in the West (47 percent put down 20 percent or more) and the Northeast (52 percent put down 20 percent or more). This is because of tighter markets and the need to present a more competitive offer to a seller in order to win the home.
Real estate agents are important partners when you’re buying or selling a home. Real estate agents can provide you with helpful information on homes and neighborhoods that isn’t easily accessible to the public. Their knowledge of the home buying process, negotiating skills, and familiarity with the area you want to live in can be extremely valuable. And best of all, it doesn’t cost you anything to use an agent – they’re compensated from the commission paid by the seller of the house.
Putting off buying a home for many years to save a large down payment can be a mistake. While you’re saving your down payment, the price of that house is probably going up. While home price appreciation is not guaranteed, real estate in the U.S. has historically increased by about 4 percent per year, according to Black Knight). In 12 years, a house costing $200,000 today may be priced at over $300,000.
However, the devil is in the details. You have to pay back your 401k loans, with interest – typically at 2% above the prime rate. On larger loans, that means several years’ worth of three-figure monthly payments and several thousand in interest charges. Plus, if you take out a 401k loan before applying for a mortgage loan, your credit utilization ratio will spike, which could raise your mortgage loan’s interest rate or cause the bank to think twice about lending to you in the first place.
"Down payment": It's amazing that these two little words have such a profound influence on your homeownership process—and your life! Ask most people what is an acceptable down payment on a house, and nine times out 10 they'll tell you it's 20% of your home's selling price. So you do the math, figure you'd have to put down $50,000 on a $250,000 house, and break out in hives when you realize that the chances of your getting out of that tiny one-bedroom apartment are slim.
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