If you already own a home, simply call your insurance agent and let them know you’re buying a new home. They will handle writing a new policy. If you don’t have an insurance agent, now’s the time to find one because your lender will require homeowners insurance. Even if you don’t have a mortgage, insurance is a critical part of protecting your investment. You’ll also want to give utility companies your move-in date to establish service. There’s nothing like moving into a cold, dark house because you didn’t get an account with the power company!
Take as much time as you need to find the right home. Then work with your real estate agent to negotiate a fair offer based on the value of comparable homes in the same neighborhood. Once you and the seller have reached agreement on a price, the house will go into escrow, which is the period of time it takes to complete all of the remaining steps in the home buying process.
VA Loans. If you or your spouse is a current or former member of the military, your family may qualify for a VA home loan backed by the federal government (Department of Veterans Affairs). On the down payment front, VA loans are even better than FHA loans – they require no money down, though you’re free to put money down and reduce the total amount you must borrow. If interest rates drop after you’ve been in your house for a while, look into VA streamline refinance loans (IRRRL), which can reduce your rates significantly at a lower cost than a conventional refinance loan.
You might be surprised to find that some private mortgage programs also have low down payment requirements. Most conventional loans have guidelines set by either Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae. Because these loans must conform to this set of guidelines, they are called “conforming” loans. To offset the risk of lending with smaller down payments, conventional lenders require borrowers to purchase private mortgage insurance, or PMI, when they put less than 20 percent down on a home.
Paying off credit card debt isn’t always straightforward, though. Focus on your highest-interest debt first (debt avalanche method), even if that means putting as little as $25 or $50 extra toward your payment each month. As your high-interest debt load shrinks, you can move onto lower-interest credit card debt, and you’ll likely accelerate your progress toward a $0 balance. With lower (or no) interest charges eating into your spending and saving power, you can then direct your dollars toward your down payment fund.
If you are unable to make a 20% down payment, there are many lenders that will allow you to make a smaller down payment on a house. Among them is the FHA, which offers mortgages with as little as 3.5% down, if your annual income is under a certain amount that varies by market. There are even some lenders, like the U.S. Department of Agriculture, that allow you to put 0% down, but eligible homes are usually in rural areas, and your income must meet certain low requirements.
The advent of online banking makes it easier than ever to save small amounts of money without even realizing it. Some major banks, including Bank of America (Keep the Change) and U.S. Bank (S.T.A.R.T.), empower deposit account holders to save their spare change from every transaction using apps that automatically round debit card payments up to the nearest whole dollar and sock away the remainder in a savings account.
As one of the oldest (and easiest to remember) home listing resources, Homes.com offers a clean interface consumers love, and home search tools that let home shoppers choose their nice-to-haves and must have home features. With millions of listings of houses, condos, townhomes and apartments for rent or sale, Homes.com is the only website (or home search app) you'll need. Consumer-first, simply smarter. We think you'll love finding your next home on Homes.com
Oh, and did we mention the Los Angeles weather? With year-round high temperatures that rarely dip below 70 degrees Fahrenheit, it's safe to say that in LA, it's nearly always a great day for a trip to the beach. The only problem you'll have is choosing which beach to go to. Would you prefer the carnivalesque atmosphere of the Santa Monica pier? Or maybe you'd like to experience the vibrant local color of Venice beach? If you're feeling swanky, put on your best designer swimsuit and spend the day sunning on Manhattan Beach. The choice is yours. And speaking of choices, when it comes to real estate, Los Angeles homes for sale truly have it all. Whether you're seeking to purchase an affordable starter home in an up-and-coming neighborhood, an immaculately restored historical bungalow, a mid-century masterpiece or a chic, modern mansion, the city of LA has just what you're after. Not quite ready to buy? No problem. You'll also find plenty of apartments for rent in Los Angeles in our rentals section, ranging from affordable to opulent. Great places go fast in LA, though, so make sure you have your checkbook ready. The world-famous Los Angeles lifestyle is waiting for you.
Stylish condominium in the Heart of Hollywood! This light and bright unit boasts 2 bedrooms and 2.5 baths, an open floorplan, a gas fireplace in the living room, indoor laundry, and a spacious balcony. The master suite features a walk-in closet and en-suite bath with a soaking tub and rainfall shower. All this in a secure building with gated subterranean parking. Community rooftop sun deck and BBQ. Amazing location close to Metro Line and everything Hollywood has to offer! Take a virtual tour of this home: https://bit.ly/2UBcQsa.
"Down payment": It's amazing that these two little words have such a profound influence on your homeownership process—and your life! Ask most people what is an acceptable down payment on a house, and nine times out 10 they'll tell you it's 20% of your home's selling price. So you do the math, figure you'd have to put down $50,000 on a $250,000 house, and break out in hives when you realize that the chances of your getting out of that tiny one-bedroom apartment are slim.
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